What’s in the latest Firefox update? Firefox 70 stops social media trackers


Mozilla on Tuesday upgraded Firefox to version 70, enhancing its anti-tracking technology with new blockers that automatically stymie social media trackers and compiling reports so users can see what spying the browser has stopped.

Security engineers at Mozilla also included patches for 13 vulnerabilities, one marked “Critical” and three marked “High,” the organization’s two top threat ratings. The critical flaw was described as “memory safety bugs,” a label that’s present in virtually every Firefox upgrade’s patch list. “Some of these bugs showed evidence of memory corruption and we presume that with enough effort some of these could be exploited to run arbitrary code,” Mozilla wrote in the accompanying security advisory.

Firefox 70 can be downloaded for Windows, macOS and Linux from Mozilla’s site. Because Firefox updates in the background, most users need only relaunch the browser to get the latest version. To manually update, pull up the menu under the three horizontal bars at the upper right, then click the help icon (the question mark within a circle). Choose “About Firefox.” The resulting page shows that the browser is either up to date or describes the refresh process.

Mozilla updates Firefox every six to eight weeks; it last upgraded the browser on Sept. 3.

Stops trackers from Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn

Mozilla amped up its assault on trackers, the bits and pieces in websites and on pages that collectively allow advertisers — primarily but not exclusively them — to watch where users go on the web in an effort to piece together profiles, which in turn are used to deliver advertisements that, theoretically at least, should be more appealing and likely to trigger a purchase.

On the heels of Firefox 69, which switched on Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) for all users, Mozilla this version added trackers from several social media giants — Facebook, Twitter and the jobs-related LinkedIn (owned by Microsoft) — to the browser’s block list.



www.computerworld.com