The first DDoS attack was 20 years ago. This is what we’ve learned since.


July 22, 1999, is an ominous date in the history of computing. On that day, a computer at the University of Minnesota suddenly came under attack from a network of 114 other computers infected with a malicious script called Trin00.

This code caused the infected computers to send superfluous data packets to the university, overwhelming its computer and preventing it handling legitimate requests. In this way, the attack knocked out the university computer for two days.

This was the world’s first distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. But it didn’t take long for the tactic to spread. In the months that followed, numerous other websites became victims, including Yahoo, Amazon, and CNN. Each was flooded with data packets that prevented it from accepting legitimate traffic. And in each case, the malicious data packets came from a network of infected computers.

Since then, DDoS attacks have become common. Malicious actors also make a lucrative trade in extorting protection money from websites they threaten to attack. They even sell their services on the dark web. A 24-hour DDoS attack against a single target can cost as little as $400.  

But the cost to the victim can be huge in terms of lost revenue or damaged reputation. That in turn has created a market for cyberdefense that protects against these kinds of attacks. In 2018, this market was worth a staggering €2 billion. All this raises the important question of whether more can be done to defend against DDoS attacks.

Today, 20 years after the first attack, Eric Osterweil from George Mason University in Virginia and colleagues explore the nature of DDoS attacks, how they have evolved, and whether there are foundational problems with network architecture that need to be addressed to make it safer. The answers, they say, are far from straightforward: “The landscape of cheap, compromisable, bots has only become more fertile to miscreants, and more damaging to Internet service operators.”

First some background. DDoS…



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